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    Article
    He, Jinli
    Wang Guowei’s 王國維 (1887-1927) understanding of the idea of tragedy was inspired by two German philosophers—Schopenhauer and Nietzsche. It is generally held that the pessimistic philosophy of Schopenhauer plays a fundamental role in Wang’s borrowing fr . . .
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    Article
    Groves, J. Randall
    This paper is a work of what I call “critical comparativism.” I compare civilizations and try to use the results to suggest more critical ways of thinking about our own society. One of the benefits of comparativism is that it allows us to be critical . . .
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    Article
    McBride, William L.
    This paper constitutes a brief overview of Western philosophy of law, with special emphasis on its putative (at least to some) originator, Hegel while not forgetting the importance of law for a number of more classical Western philosophers. It takes n . . .
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    Article
    Storey, David
    I argue that historical and comparative analyses of Heidegger and Zen Buddhism are motivated by three simple ideas: 1) Zen is uncompromisingly nonmetaphysical; 2) its discourse is poetic and non-rational; and 3) it aims to provoke a radical transforma . . .
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    Article
    Jiang, Xinyan
    "Rationality" is generally regarded as a concept exclusive to Western philosophy. In this paper I intend to show that even if in Chinese philosophy there is not a term equivalent to “rationality” in Western philosophy, Chinese philosophers have discus . . .
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    Article
    Chen, Xunwu
    Using the story of the protagonist Lin Daiyu in the Chinese classical novel A Dream of Red Mansions as the literary paradigm, this paper explores the traditional Chinese philosophical concept of wu ji bi fan (extremity produces selfdestruction; extrem . . .