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  • Vm40xv922?file=thumbnail
    Thesis
    Nunes, Michelle
    This paper is an attempt to explain the conceptual underpinnings of my work while simultaneously serving as a work within itself. It seems only appropriate to have a paper as malleable in meaning as my work intends to be, otherwise the idea of fluid m . . .
  • 1831cn95d?file=thumbnail
    Article
    Lytle, Christian
    To examine the evolution of endurance-exercise behaviour, we have selectively bred four replicate lines of laboratory mice (Mus domesticus) for high voluntary wheel running (`high runner' or HR lines), while also maintaining four non-selected control . . .
  • Xg94hs39x?file=thumbnail
    Thesis
    Monterroso, Joseph
    My family, my commute and my relationships guide my work and denote the passage of time. My photographic series, "the first light I see," has both figurative and literal connotations. I photograph the first intersection I encounter on my commute in or . . .
  • Gb19f829c?file=thumbnail
    Thesis
    Karimi, Marzieh
    Certain objects and places activate feelings, memories, and thoughts, which ebb and flow over time. My quiet images challenge the simultaneity of absence and presence, truth and fiction in photographs. Informed by the experience of displacement, fragm . . .
  • Q237hv457?file=thumbnail
    Thesis
    Bonelli, Krista
    Time is expressed through both expansion and contraction in my work. In Quotidian, daily self-portraits are digitally assembled so that the layers are recognizable through subtle, partial visual cues, though the images become indistinct. Quotidian str . . .
  • St74cs061?file=thumbnail
    Book Chapter
    Levine, Robert
    There are profound cultural differences in how people think about, measure, and use their time. This module describes some major dimensions of time that are most prone to cultural variation.
  • S1784m267?file=thumbnail
    Thesis
    Malobisky, Scott
    During the decade prior to 1922-1939--and during these seventeen years that James Joyce devoted to the writing of Finnegans Wake--the new and radical theories of Relativity and Quantum Theory became more accessible to the general public, highly discus . . .