Article

An Intensive, Progressive Exercise Program Reduces Disability And Improves Functional Performance In Patients After Single-Level Lumbar Microdiskectomy

Background Restoration of physical function following lumbar microdiskectomy may be influenced by the postoperative care provided. Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a new interventional protocol to improve functional performance in patients who have undergone a single-level lumbar microdiskectomy. Setting The study was conducted in physical therapy outpatient clinics. Design and Participants Ninety-eight participants (53 male, 45 female) who had undergone a single-level lumbar microdiskectomy were randomly allocated to receive education only or exercise and education. Intervention and Measurements The exercise intervention consisted of a 12-week periodized program of back extensor strength (force-generating capacity) and endurance training and mat and upright therapeutic exercises. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and physical measures of functional performance were tested 4 to 6 weeks postsurgery and 12 weeks later, following completion of the intervention program. Because some participants sought physical therapy outside of the study, postintervention scores were analyzed for both an as-randomized (2-group) design and an as-treated (3-group) design. Results In the 2-group analyses, exercise and education resulted in a greater reduction in ODI scores and a greater improvement in distance walked. In the 3-group analyses, post hoc comparisons showed a significantly greater reduction in ODI scores following exercise and education compared with the education-only and usual physical therapy groups. Limitations The limitations of this study include a lack of adherence to group assignment, disproportionate therapist contact time among treatment groups, and multiple use of univariate analyses. Conclusions An intensive, progressive exercise program combined with education reduces disability and improves function in patients who have undergone a single-level lumbar microdiskectomy.

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