Thesis

Beyond the movement : an institutional ethnographic study of fair trade participation in Sacramento

Thesis (M.A., Sociology) -- California State University, Sacramento, 2008.

This study examines the daily practice offair trade. More specifically, I investigate the
 text-based and discursiveforms of ruling that guide somefair trade behavior. Openended
 in-depth interviews were conducted with fair trade business owners and customers
 in an effort to better understandfairt radep articipationf rom an insider'sp erspective.
 Institutional ethnography is the theoretical and methodologicalframework used
 throughout this investigation. Analysis reveals how 'free-trade " concepts such as
 national identity, paternalism and the construction of the Other based on global
 difference are embedded in some informants' moral economy perceptions and
 discussions offair trade. Through textual and discursive relations with fair trade
 literature and other participants, informants discuss the ways in which they appropriate
 'free-trade " concepts and reproduce them within fair trade discourses. A discussion of
 why these findings are problematicforfair trade business owners, consumers and
 activists alike is addressed in this study.

This study examines the daily practice offair trade. More specifically, I investigate the text-based and discursiveforms of ruling that guide somefair trade behavior. Openended in-depth interviews were conducted with fair trade business owners and customers in an effort to better understandfairt radep articipationf rom an insider'sp erspective. Institutional ethnography is the theoretical and methodologicalframework used throughout this investigation. Analysis reveals how 'free-trade " concepts such as national identity, paternalism and the construction of the Other based on global difference are embedded in some informants' moral economy perceptions and discussions offair trade. Through textual and discursive relations with fair trade literature and other participants, informants discuss the ways in which they appropriate 'free-trade " concepts and reproduce them within fair trade discourses. A discussion of why these findings are problematicforfair trade business owners, consumers and activists alike is addressed in this study.

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