Thesis

Utilizing reflective journaling to enhance fourth grade students' performance on weekly math assessments

Since the introduction of No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), teachers have
 created different methods in preparation for state-wide testing. Through NCLB, the
 government has identified mathematics as one of the subjects in which students need to
 reach proficiency by 2014. However, the current state of student mathematical performance
 may make reaching this goal more difficult. For instance, students are accountable
 for knowing more concepts and are evaluated with higher standards than previous years.
 For students to reach proficiency, students in the elementary grades need to have a clear
 understanding of these concepts.
 The following action research study examined the question, “How does the
 use of reflective journaling impact fourth grade students' performance on weekly math assessments?” From this central question, an additional question was addressed, “How
 does reflective writing impact students understanding of academic language?”
 These questions were investigated by creating and implementing reflective
 journaling at one school site with one low-performing fourth grade math class. In the
 classroom, 11 students’ data were collected during the second and third trimester. The
 data were triangulated by collecting and analyzing the students’ assessments, homework,
 and reflective journals. In the second trimester, the students’ assessments and
 homework were collected and analyzed. The data were then compared to the data collected
 from the students’ third trimesters’ assessments, homework, and reflective journaling.
 Within each journal entry, an academic language component was also addressed.
 After the reflective journaling was implemented, the students’ assessment
 scores increased, and the students were also understanding and articulating the academic
 words used in each lesson.

Since the introduction of No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), teachers have created different methods in preparation for state-wide testing. Through NCLB, the government has identified mathematics as one of the subjects in which students need to reach proficiency by 2014. However, the current state of student mathematical performance may make reaching this goal more difficult. For instance, students are accountable for knowing more concepts and are evaluated with higher standards than previous years. For students to reach proficiency, students in the elementary grades need to have a clear understanding of these concepts. The following action research study examined the question, “How does the use of reflective journaling impact fourth grade students' performance on weekly math assessments?” From this central question, an additional question was addressed, “How does reflective writing impact students understanding of academic language?” These questions were investigated by creating and implementing reflective journaling at one school site with one low-performing fourth grade math class. In the classroom, 11 students’ data were collected during the second and third trimester. The data were triangulated by collecting and analyzing the students’ assessments, homework, and reflective journals. In the second trimester, the students’ assessments and homework were collected and analyzed. The data were then compared to the data collected from the students’ third trimesters’ assessments, homework, and reflective journaling. Within each journal entry, an academic language component was also addressed. After the reflective journaling was implemented, the students’ assessment scores increased, and the students were also understanding and articulating the academic words used in each lesson.

Relationships

Items