Thesis

Reducing equivocality and uncertainty on Facebook: examining the level of “richness” cues in Facebook features

Over the last ten years social media sites, such as Facebook, were widely adopted and used as tools to communicate by people around the world. Since communication via Facebook became increasingly more common, it is important that researchers examine how additive non-verbal cues might be translated into social media computer mediated communication. Drawing on the four central components of media richness theory: multiple cues, rapid feedback, natural language, and personal focus, and by applying a social information processing perspective, this study looked at whether people perceive Facebook features to decrease equivocality and uncertainty in Facebook posts. The data collected demonstrated that people perceive Facebook features to decrease equivocality and uncertainty, and that these features function as additive non-verbal cues in communication on Facebook.

Relationships

Items