Thesis

A correlational study of perceived paternal nurturance, self-perception, and leadership status among fifth and sixth grade boys

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of a boy's perception of a nurturant father, self-perception, and leadership status among fifth and sixth grade boys in a public, elementary school in Southern California. The subjects randomly selected for this study were 50, fifth and sixth grade males. The Bronfenbrenner Parent Behavior Questionnaire was employed to assess the boy's perception of his relationship with his father or father-figure. The Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory was utilized to obtain a measure of each subject's self-perception. In order to establish the leadership status of each male participant, the Who Are They? Test was administered to both males and females in each of four classrooms involved in the study. The data were analyzed by correlation coefficients and a correlated t-test between perceived paternal nurturance, self-perception, and leadership status. Results showed that there was a statistically significant relationship between perceived paternal nurturance and self-perception and a significant relationship between self-perception and leadership status for fifth and sixth grade boys at the .05 level. However, no significant relationship was found between leadership status and perceived paternal nurturance. Boys who perceive a nurturing relationship with their fathers and have positive self-concepts may not necessarily be considered leaders among their peers. From the results of this study, the following recommendations were made: (1) It was recommended that cross-cultural studies be conducted, examining the relationship between perceived paternal nurturance, self-perception, and leadership status. (2) It was recommended that further studies be conducted among middle class children who's language in the home is standard English. (3) It was recommended that each testing instrument be administered on separate days. (4) It was recommended that subjects be randomly selected from several schools rather than one. (5) It was recommended that further studies be executed to explore the relationship of successful peer interaction and paternal nurturance.

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