Thesis

Parental status and life satisfaction: a survey of California residents’ attitudes towards parenthood

Thesis (M.A., Sociology)--California State University, Sacramento, 2017.

This study explores links between parental status and attitudes towards parenthood through the
 analysis of data received from California State University, Sacramento’s annual CALSPEAKS
 survey. Previously used researched questions on this topic were added by special request to the
 core set of questions on the CALSPEAKS omnibus survey along with questions measuring life
 satisfaction. In light of the passage of Paid Family Leave legislation in 2002, California parents
 were hypothesized to report higher levels of satisfaction than nonparents. California parents were
 also hypothesized to hold more conventional ideas about children compared to nonparents.
 General findings support the first hypothesis indicating uniquely high satisfaction levels by
 California parents that are less frequently seen in U.S. samples. The second hypothesis was also
 confirmed with California parents holding more conventional ideas about parenthood than
 nonparents. The results of this sample point to possible positive large-scale national impacts of
 paid leave policies within the United States as well as the role of social policies in shaping the
 impact of children on life satisfaction.

This study explores links between parental status and attitudes towards parenthood through the analysis of data received from California State University, Sacramento’s annual CALSPEAKS survey. Previously used researched questions on this topic were added by special request to the core set of questions on the CALSPEAKS omnibus survey along with questions measuring life satisfaction. In light of the passage of Paid Family Leave legislation in 2002, California parents were hypothesized to report higher levels of satisfaction than nonparents. California parents were also hypothesized to hold more conventional ideas about children compared to nonparents. General findings support the first hypothesis indicating uniquely high satisfaction levels by California parents that are less frequently seen in U.S. samples. The second hypothesis was also confirmed with California parents holding more conventional ideas about parenthood than nonparents. The results of this sample point to possible positive large-scale national impacts of paid leave policies within the United States as well as the role of social policies in shaping the impact of children on life satisfaction.

Relationships

Items