Thesis

Attitudes towards End-of-Life Issues in Chronic Vegetative State among Community-Dwelling Elderly Chinese Immigrants

Discussing Death or dying is a taboo in many Asian cultures, including Chinese culture. Older Asian Americans were reported less likely to use hospice care than older White Americans. Chinese is the largest sub-ethnic group among all the Asian Americans, and they are profoundly influenced by their collectivistic culture and prefer the family decision-making model. While in the context of U.S. healthcare, patients' autonomy in decision-making is advocated. Studies among other ethnicities in the U.S. indicated that personal experience with illness, functional status, level of acculturation, and some demographic factors were associated with the attitudes towards life-sustaining treatment at end-of-life (EOL). This study explored the relationships of functional status and acculturation level with attitudes towards EOL in chronic vegetative state among community-dwelling elderly Chinese immigrants in the States.

Discussing Death or dying is a taboo in many Asian cultures, including Chinese culture. Older Asian Americans were reported less likely to use hospice care than older White Americans. Chinese is the largest sub-ethnic group among all the Asian Americans, and they are profoundly influenced by their collectivistic culture and prefer the family decision-making model. While in the context of U.S. healthcare, patients' autonomy in decision-making is advocated. Studies among other ethnicities in the U.S. indicated that personal experience with illness, functional status, level of acculturation, and some demographic factors were associated with the attitudes towards life-sustaining treatment at end-of-life (EOL). This study explored the relationships of functional status and acculturation level with attitudes towards EOL in chronic vegetative state among community-dwelling elderly Chinese immigrants in the States.

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