Dissertation

The Experiences of First Year Community College Students on Academic Probation

The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of first year community college students on academic probation. a mixed methods, two-phase sequential explanatory research design was implemented to carry out this study. the quantitative first phase utilized a multiple logistical regression to examine if age, gender, race and ethnicity, Board of Governors Fee Waiver (BOG) status, hours worked weekly, and units attempted predicted a higher likelihood of academic probation status for first year community college students. the quantitative first phase analyzed student data across five academic years. the first phase’s results informed the purposeful sampling that identified the participants for the qualitative second phase. the first phase’s results also informed a portion of the semi-structured interview protocol, which also included other questions specifically designed for this study and questions adapted from Duffy (2010). the ethnic identification of Latina/o and Race other, 20–29 hours worked weekly, male, BOG recipient, and units attempted predicted a higher likelihood of academic probation status during the first year of community college. Age was not found to predict a higher likelihood of academic probation status. the following eight emergent themes were produced when participants were asked about their perceptions of being first year students on academic probation: wake up call, underestimated college, life outside of school, time management, isolation, seeking community, wanting intrusiveness, and potential to succeed. Varying perceptions of the relationship between academic probation status and being Latina/o, 20–29 hours worked weekly, male, BOG recipients, and units were described. Implications for practice are also presented.

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