Thesis

The reading comprehension growth of the five lowest readers in one second grade class where Connecting the known to the new , Question the text , and Visualizing the text , are explicitly taught over a twelve week period

In recent years the educational system has seen a great need for reading comprehension curriculum. Although there are many methods available to teachers, three skills in particular, Questioning the Text, Connecting the Known to the New, and Visual Imagery, seem very appropriate and highly encouraged for second grade readers. The purpose of this paper was to measure how much growth the five lowest readers, in one selfcontained second grade classroom, made after twelve weeks of explicit instruction in Questioning the Text, Connecting the Known to the New, and Visual Imagery. To measure growth, students were given three assessments. The DRA to measure decoding and reading comprehension, an Auditory Comprehension assessment, to determine reading comprehension without the interference of decoding, and a Skills Assessment to measure the usage of Questioning the Text, Connecting the Known to the New, and Visual Imagery. All three assessments were given before and after the twelve-week instructional session. Five students were selected, three girls and two boys. One girl was classified as ELL while the other students were monolingual native English speakers. All five students attended Skinner Elementary, which was in a small school district, drawing upon middle income families. 35% of Skinner's population was classified as minority. All five students were in the same selfcontained second grade classroom. Students were taught how to use the skills Questioning the Text, Connecting the Known to the New, and Visual Imagery, over a twelve week period, during whole group instruction. Skills were reinforced with review during guided reading groups. Students were selected based on their DRA scores from the beginning of the year. The lowest five students were selected for this paper After the twelve-week session all five students made growth in both decoding and comprehension. All five students were also using all three skills more than before instruction had been given. Out of the three skills, the students used Questioning more often than Connecting or Visualization. After examining all the post-assessments, the results seem to indicate that although all the students benefited from explicit reading comprehension instruction in, Questioning the Text, Connecting the Known to the New, and Visual Imagery, these three skills are not going to help every student. Nor should these skills be the only skills used when teach students how to become better at comprehending.

Relationships

Items