Graduate project

A study of self-concept in deaf students

This paper presents a comparative study of self-concept in deaf students with deaf parents as opposed to deaf students with hearing parents. The students involved in the study were of junior high and senior high levels at the American School for the Deaf, Hartford, Connecticut, and the California State School for the Deaf, Riverside. The general hypothesis was that deaf students with deaf parents would have a better self-concept than deaf students with hearing parents. A questionnaire was designed to measure self-concept in the following sub-scale areas: (1) school, (2) family, (3) self, (4) friends, and (5) future. A secondary purpose of this paper was to evaluate whether or not the rank order within the family seemed to effect the self-concept of the deaf child. A total of 116 student questionnaires were analyzed; 29 students with deaf parents vs. 87 students with hearing parents. The 29 students with deaf parents compiled the total number within that grouping, while the 87 students with hearing parents were selected from a random sampling. Of the five sub-scales evaluated by an analysis of variance, only school and self displayed no significant difference between the two student groups. Significant difference was found in family, friends, and future. Overall, students with deaf parents had higher self-concept scores. Further analysis showed that variables such as sex, school, grade, age, SES (social-economic status) of parents, and birth order had no significant influence on their self-concept.

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