Graduate project

You silly idiot

You Silly Idiot is a collection of short stories that explores the relationship
 between self-reflection and the transitory nature of memory as it is influenced by prejudice and
 time itself. The author implements the literary conventions of fiction as well as influences from
 the school of creative nonfiction and investigates the process of personal acceptance through
 forgiveness—forgiveness of others as well as forgiveness of the self. The stories are told
 through the lens of a maturing young woman seeking identity through conversation with
 prominent male figures of her past. These letters, meant to go unanswered, act as a conduit for
 the narrator to recognize and acknowledge former insecurities and demonstrate to the reader
 how far she has actually come—how far they themselves have actually come, if they think
 about it. The contemplative nature of this collection began as an exercise of my own personal,
 critical self-reflection and is the foundation for these first person monologues. The rawness of
 language and content from contemporary fiction writers like Junot Díaz paired with the concise
 and economic style of creative nonfiction authors like Joan Didion were the primary influence
 for this collection. As an open exploration of contemporary issues ranging from dating in the
 world of technology to an investigation of modern gender roles, this collection is geared toward an audience of twenty-somethings negotiating life in college and the confusion that follows
 those years.

You Silly Idiot is a collection of short stories that explores the relationship between self-reflection and the transitory nature of memory as it is influenced by prejudice and time itself. The author implements the literary conventions of fiction as well as influences from the school of creative nonfiction and investigates the process of personal acceptance through forgiveness—forgiveness of others as well as forgiveness of the self. The stories are told through the lens of a maturing young woman seeking identity through conversation with prominent male figures of her past. These letters, meant to go unanswered, act as a conduit for the narrator to recognize and acknowledge former insecurities and demonstrate to the reader how far she has actually come—how far they themselves have actually come, if they think about it. The contemplative nature of this collection began as an exercise of my own personal, critical self-reflection and is the foundation for these first person monologues. The rawness of language and content from contemporary fiction writers like Junot Díaz paired with the concise and economic style of creative nonfiction authors like Joan Didion were the primary influence for this collection. As an open exploration of contemporary issues ranging from dating in the world of technology to an investigation of modern gender roles, this collection is geared toward an audience of twenty-somethings negotiating life in college and the confusion that follows those years.

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