Thesis

The impact of in-service education on ICU nurses' knowledge and compliance with practices for preventing ventilator-associated pneumonia

Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP) is the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). A diagnosis of VAP automatically translates to increased morbidity and mortality rates, length of stay, and treatment costs. Although VAP prevention requires a multi-disciplinary approach, ICU nurses play a pivotal role in the prevention of VAP. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of in-service education on ICU nurses’ knowledge and compliance with practices for preventing VAP. A quasi-experimental nonequivalent groups design was selected to examine nurses’ knowledge and compliance with ventilator bundle elements before and after in-service education. One sample nonparametric testing was used to analyze pretest and posttest scores. Twenty-five nurses from the interventional group scored 100% on the pretest (no room for improvement), resulting in a statistically significant score increase (p=.009). However, nurses who had room for improvement, had a mean score increase of 1.33 (P<.0.0 =0.0156. The overall compliance with ventilator bundle elements had a mean increase of 4.3% among the intervention group. Results of this study showed evidence to support the claim that an educational in-service is effective in improving knowledge and compliance with elements of the ventilator bundle.

Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP) is the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). A diagnosis of VAP automatically translates to increased morbidity and mortality rates, length of stay, and treatment costs. Although VAP prevention requires a multi-disciplinary approach, ICU nurses play a pivotal role in the prevention of VAP. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of in-service education on ICU nurses’ knowledge and compliance with practices for preventing VAP. A quasi-experimental nonequivalent groups design was selected to examine nurses’ knowledge and compliance with ventilator bundle elements before and after in-service education. One sample nonparametric testing was used to analyze pretest and posttest scores. Twenty-five nurses from the interventional group scored 100% on the pretest (no room for improvement), resulting in a statistically significant score increase (p=.009). However, nurses who had room for improvement, had a mean score increase of 1.33 (P<.0.0 =0.0156. The overall compliance with ventilator bundle elements had a mean increase of 4.3% among the intervention group. Results of this study showed evidence to support the claim that an educational in-service is effective in improving knowledge and compliance with elements of the ventilator bundle.

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