Thesis

Improving student achievement in English Language Arts with guided language acquisition design strategies

Approximately one-half of California students are not proficient in English language arts (ELA). In order to help students overcome this challenge, educators must implement effective instructional strategies in the classroom. During this study, the focus was to determine how Guided Language Acquisition Design (GLAD) effects student achievement in ELA. Thirty first-grade students (treatment group) received daily instruction from the district adopted reading program and supplemental instruction from the GLAD program during the 2014–2015 academic year and 30 first-grade students (control group) received daily instruction from the district adopted reading program only during the 2013–2014 academic year. Assessments were administered to students prior to and after participation in the program. Results of the program were analyzed with the use of an ANCOVA. The present study found a significant difference in writing in favor of the treatment group and a significant difference in reading level in favor of the control group. There was no significant difference in reading fluency and comprehension between the treatment group and the control group.

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