Thesis

The effects of two resistance training intensities on glucose tolerance

To determine the effects of intensity of an acute bout of resistance exercise on glycemic response, nine healthy college-aged (23.9 ± 2.3 years) males participated in two separate bouts (65%, 85% of 1 repetition maximum) of resistance exercise in random order. Each subject took part in three laboratory visits that were separated by a minimum of 72 hours. Subjects were given a baseline oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) followed by a 1 repetition maximum strength test to assess baseline glucose tolerance and strength in the squat, deadlift, bench press, overhead press, and lat pull down. Following the baseline testing, subjects were randomly assigned to either a 65% or 85% one repetition maximum workout that was immediately followed by an OGTT and then were tested again at the opposite intensity. Each exercise was performed for three sets to failure with 2 minutes of rest between each set. Overall there were no significant differences between the baseline OGTT, post-65% exercise OGTT, and the post-85% exercise OGTT at any of the 5 blood sampling periods. In all five lifts more work was performed in the 65% exercise session with 26% less total work being done in the 85% exercise session. It can be suggested that the less dramatic glycemic response of the post-65% exercise group compared to that of the post-85% exercise is a product of the greater amount of work done in the 65% one repetition maximum strength exercise session. The greater work would have also led to a greater glycogen depletion which would have stimulated muscles to take up blood-borne glucose to a greater degree to replenish the depleted glycogen stores. The only way this can truly be evaluated however is to calculate the area under the curve to look at the entire 120 minute period rather than each time point individually.

To determine the effects of intensity of an acute bout of resistance exercise on glycemic response, nine healthy college-aged (23.9 ± 2.3 years) males participated in two separate bouts (65%, 85% of 1 repetition maximum) of resistance exercise in random order. Each subject took part in three laboratory visits that were separated by a minimum of 72 hours. Subjects were given a baseline oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) followed by a 1 repetition maximum strength test to assess baseline glucose tolerance and strength in the squat, deadlift, bench press, overhead press, and lat pull down. Following the baseline testing, subjects were randomly assigned to either a 65% or 85% one repetition maximum workout that was immediately followed by an OGTT and then were tested again at the opposite intensity. Each exercise was performed for three sets to failure with 2 minutes of rest between each set. Overall there were no significant differences between the baseline OGTT, post-65% exercise OGTT, and the post-85% exercise OGTT at any of the 5 blood sampling periods. In all five lifts more work was performed in the 65% exercise session with 26% less total work being done in the 85% exercise session. It can be suggested that the less dramatic glycemic response of the post-65% exercise group compared to that of the post-85% exercise is a product of the greater amount of work done in the 65% one repetition maximum strength exercise session. The greater work would have also led to a greater glycogen depletion which would have stimulated muscles to take up blood-borne glucose to a greater degree to replenish the depleted glycogen stores. The only way this can truly be evaluated however is to calculate the area under the curve to look at the entire 120 minute period rather than each time point individually.

Relationships

Items