Thesis

The Effects of instruction and practice in test-taking skills on the standardized reading test scores of randomly selected, culturally different, second grade students in a Title I school

Evidence developed by noted test measurement experts (Vernon, 1954; Cronbach, 1970; Anastasi, 1969) indicated that practice and experience with tests tend to produce higher test scores, and tend to develop the components of test-wiseness. Research by Brim (1965), Goslin, et al. (1965), and Mercer (1973) indicated that culturally different children tend to lack the experiences necessary to develop test-wiseness. The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of instruction and practice in test-taking techniques upon the standardized reading test scores of culturally different, second grade students from a Tittle 1 Public Elementary School. The hypothesis was that randomly selected, culturally different second grade students from Title 1 schools who receive instruction and practice in test-taking techniques will achieve higher standardized reading test scores immediately following treatment than students who do not receive instruction and practice in test-taking techniques. Forty-three culturally different, second grade students were randomly selected from four second grade classrooms in a Title 1, public elementary school. The subjects were randomly assigned to either an experimental or a control condition. The experimental group received approximately ten, thirty-minute periods of instruction and practice in test-taking skills. The materials used had a format similar to the Stanford Achievement Test, Primary 1, Reading Form W. The control group received ten thirty-minute lessons with materials that did not have a format based on the Stanford Achievement Test. There was no deliberate instruction or practice in test-taking techniques with the control group. Analysis of covariance showed that the experimental group performed significantly better than the control group when administered the Stanford Achievement Test. The hypothesis was supported.

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