Graduate project

Deadheading

“Deadheading” is a collection of poems that can be viewed as a travelogue. This is a documentation of exploration. These poems move. They cover terrain—terrain that is physical, emotional, temporal, cultural, and spatial. This travelogue explores many elements of the world in order to convey the essence of the human condition through a variety of voices and poetic techniques.
 The characters portrayed within, a rich variety of personae, navigate through the literary wilderness of eastern Tennessee in “Southern Gothic,” go to market and return with little to show for their work in “The Muleteer Returns Home from Market,” watch native islander culture clash with the now inseparable tourist trade in “Aloha from Hawaii,” and experience urban decay in the “Baby Puke Bus” sequence of poems. Other characters encounter mental illness for the first time in “Jeff Takes a Ride Through Alta Heights, 1989,” commune with the natural world in “From bouldered perch I see” and “of bark, of branches,” and come to terms with their own grief in “In You I Recognize Myself” and “days like this keep me warm.”

“Deadheading” is a collection of poems that can be viewed as a travelogue. This is a documentation of exploration. These poems move. They cover terrain—terrain that is physical, emotional, temporal, cultural, and spatial. This travelogue explores many elements of the world in order to convey the essence of the human condition through a variety of voices and poetic techniques. The characters portrayed within, a rich variety of personae, navigate through the literary wilderness of eastern Tennessee in “Southern Gothic,” go to market and return with little to show for their work in “The Muleteer Returns Home from Market,” watch native islander culture clash with the now inseparable tourist trade in “Aloha from Hawaii,” and experience urban decay in the “Baby Puke Bus” sequence of poems. Other characters encounter mental illness for the first time in “Jeff Takes a Ride Through Alta Heights, 1989,” commune with the natural world in “From bouldered perch I see” and “of bark, of branches,” and come to terms with their own grief in “In You I Recognize Myself” and “days like this keep me warm.”

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