Thesis

Bullying and gender in California's Central Valley: a survey of high school freshmen

Bullying is an issue that continues to occur among high school students. Students are engaging in traditional bullying as well as cyberbullying. This study explores students’ experiences with being the victim of bullying and whether these experiences differ based on gender. It also explores students’ experiences with being perpetrators of bullying and whether these experiences differ based on gender. A quantitative study, which uses a traditional survey design, has been used to gain more in-depth knowledge of the relationship between gender and bullying in 105 freshmen. Out of the 105 students 51.9% report that they have been victims of some type of bullying and 29% of students report that they have taken part in bullying other students. Findings show that the most prevalent form that students are victims of is name-calling, making fun of, or being teased in a hurtful way. Additionally, the most prevalent form of bullying towards others is name-calling, making fun of, or teasing others in a hurtful way. The findings of this study suggest that for the most part, gender did not play a role in being a victim or perpetrator; with the exception of name-calling, making fun of, or being teased and teasing others. It is imperative that social workers who work with vulnerable populations, such as children, understand what bullying is and what to do when it happens.

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