Project

The adolescent brain: curriculum for students, parents, and teachers

This project addresses the problem of the challenges that teenagers, their parents, and their teachers face during the adolescent years. Adolescents’ brains are fully developed in the emotional center but not in the frontal lobe, the seat of critical thinking, organization, and decision-making. 
 
 The authors worked together to develop curriculum for the three stakeholders: a one-week introductory course on the brain for students, an educational night for parents, and a handbook with brain-friendly lesson plans for teachers.
 
 An extensive review of literature provided sources of data for the project. Components addressed in the literature review include brain physiology, executive functioning skills, strategies to support adolescents, and a discussion of objections regarding the existence of the adolescent brain.
 
 The authors concluded that providing information to students, parents, and teachers about the changes occurring in the adolescent brain benefits all parties involved. Students understand more about their experiences, parents gain useful strategies for supporting their children, and teachers receive support in creating effective, brain-friendly lessons for use in the classroom.

Project (M.A., Education (Curriculum and Instruction)) -- California State University, Sacramento, 2009.

This project addresses the problem of the challenges that teenagers, their parents, and their teachers face during the adolescent years. Adolescents’ brains are fully developed in the emotional center but not in the frontal lobe, the seat of critical thinking, organization, and decision-making. The authors worked together to develop curriculum for the three stakeholders: a one-week introductory course on the brain for students, an educational night for parents, and a handbook with brain-friendly lesson plans for teachers. An extensive review of literature provided sources of data for the project. Components addressed in the literature review include brain physiology, executive functioning skills, strategies to support adolescents, and a discussion of objections regarding the existence of the adolescent brain. The authors concluded that providing information to students, parents, and teachers about the changes occurring in the adolescent brain benefits all parties involved. Students understand more about their experiences, parents gain useful strategies for supporting their children, and teachers receive support in creating effective, brain-friendly lessons for use in the classroom.

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