Thesis

Navigating through a rape culture: a regression gauging perceived necessity for bystander intervention

Thesis (M.A., Sociology)--California State University, Sacramento, 2017.

Utilizing secondary data from the study, Rape Prevention through Bystander Education at a Northeastern State University, 2002-2004, the present study examined if rape myth acceptance is a predictor of perceived necessity for bystander intervention controlling for race, religious affiliation, sex, year in school, and income level. Other independent variables examined are previous sexual assault/rape or sexual harassment training and knowing a sexual assault victim. Using RW Connell’s interpretations of the theory of hegemonic masculinity, paired with Foucault’s theory of the Panopticon, this study examines the sociological effects of rape culture and rape myth acceptance on feelings towards victims and perceived necessity for intervention. This study further analyzes the deeper social psychological effects of the internalization of rape culture using Identity theory and Social structure and personality theories. Results indicated that having a higher level of rape myth acceptance led to significantly lower perceived necessity for intervention. Results also indicated that being male predicted lower perceived necessity for bystander intervention.

Utilizing secondary data from the study, Rape Prevention through Bystander Education at a Northeastern State University, 2002-2004, the present study examined if rape myth acceptance is a predictor of perceived necessity for bystander intervention controlling for race, religious affiliation, sex, year in school, and income level. Other independent variables examined are previous sexual assault/rape or sexual harassment training and knowing a sexual assault victim. Using RW Connell’s interpretations of the theory of hegemonic masculinity, paired with Foucault’s theory of the Panopticon, this study examines the sociological effects of rape culture and rape myth acceptance on feelings towards victims and perceived necessity for intervention. This study further analyzes the deeper social psychological effects of the internalization of rape culture using Identity theory and Social structure and personality theories. Results indicated that having a higher level of rape myth acceptance led to significantly lower perceived necessity for intervention. Results also indicated that being male predicted lower perceived necessity for bystander intervention.

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