The effect of a school centered Lindamood-Bell reading intervention on improving reading fluency and comprehension for students with learning disabilities

This study's purpose was to determine the effectiveness of a school wide reading intervention for students with learning disabilities and without learning disabilities. Students who were reading below grade level took part in a Lindamood-Bell reading intervention in a small group setting. They received instruction for one to two hours daily, ranging from 50 hours to 437 hours per student. General education and special education intervention students' growth scores on pre-intervention and post-intervention assessments were compared to each other, as well as to all students in the grade level to determine the effectiveness of the intervention. Over the two year span of the study, the intervention group students in general education had an average fluency growth of 56 words and students in special education had a gain of 54 words with grade level fluency screens. When evaluated on grade level comprehension on a scale of one to ten, growth was an average of 1.9 points for intervention students in general education and 1.8 points for students i-n .special education. State testing language arts raw scores for intervention students in general education went up an average of 31 points and students in special education saw an increase of 29 points. Although intervention students in general education consistently have slightly higher growth scores, students with and without learning disabilities improved in reading comprehension, fluency, and state test language arts scores. Key Words: Lindamood-Bellliteracy intervention, reading comprehension, reading fluency, special education, learning disabilities

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