Thesis

An exploration of the triadic model of procrastination: arousal, avoidant, and decisional procrastination in adults

This study explored correlates and predictors of procrastination in a large sample of adults. It explored procrastination as a multidimensional construct consisting of arousal, avoidant, and decisional procrastination. These sub-forms of procrastination make up the triadic model of procrastination. Procrastination research has primarily focused on academic procrastination due to high prevalence rates of student procrastinators in academic settings. A shift in procrastination research has now examined procrastination in non-academic domains. The current study examined the responses of 404 adults who resided in the United States. Multiple regression analyses were conducted between the five factor model of personality and the triadic model of procrastination as well as between three sub-forms of perfectionism (self-oriented, other-oriented, and socially prescribed perfectionism) and the triadic model of procrastination. Personality traits as well as sub-forms of perfectionism were identified as significant predictors of arousal, avoidant, and decisional procrastination. These findings further our knowledge and understanding of the nature of arousal, avoidant, and decisional procrastination in adults. The current study provided a more comprehensive analysis of the triadic model of procrastination and its relationship with personality traits and dimensions of perfectionism.

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