Thesis

Video production as an instructional strategy: its effect on student achievement and motivation

This study investigated the use of video production in the classroom as an instructional strategy and its effect on student achievement and motivation. The participants were teachers in Project LIVE (Learning through Instructional Video in Education), a staff development program in one elementary school district, federally funded by an EETT (Enhancing Education Through Technology) formula grant. Teachers received training, software, and computer and video equipment to implement video production in the classroom. This research examined standardized test scores for the students in fourth and fifth grades whose teachers participated in the program for one year. Students and teachers also participated in a survey at the end of one school year of participation, which provided anecdotal information. Results suggest that the use of video production in the classroom improves student achievement in Language Arts, Math and English acquisition. Test scores for most sub-groups of students increased on the California Standards Tests (CST), California English Language Development Test (CELDT), and the Northwest Evaluation Association Test (NWEA), at a greater rate than those students not using video production in the classroom. Responses on surveys by students and teachers were positive for using video production as an instructional strategy.

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