Thesis

The relationship between death anxiety and religiosity in hispanic and non-hispanic college students

The death anxiety literature has been conducted based almost exclusively on a European population. Therefore, generalizing findings to other populations can be difficult. There has been a lack of focus on minority groups such as Hispanics in the death anxiety literature. The present study examined the relationship between religiosity, gender, ethnicity, and death anxiety in Hispanic and non-Hispanic college students. This study included a total of 106 participants between the ages of 18 to 52. The Revised Death Anxiety Scale measured death anxiety, the Religiosity Measure assessed religiosity, and additional information was gathered through a demographic questionnaire. No association between death anxiety and religiosity was found for both Hispanic and non-Hispanic college students. The first hypothesis that women would express more death anxiety than men was not supported. That is women and men did not differ in death anxiety scores. For the second hypothesis religiosity, gender, and ethnicity did not significantly account for the variance in death anxiety levels in Hispanic and non-Hispanic college students. A positive relationship between religiosity and death anxiety in Hispanic college students was found, but not in non-Hispanic college students. Hispanic college students who expressed higher levels of religiosity also expressed higher levels of death anxiety.

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