Thesis

Evaluating the effects of and preference for positive and negative punishment in the Good Behavior Game

The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a group contingency that has demonstrated to be an effective intervention in reducing disruptive behavior across various settings, populations, and range of classroom grades. The GBG involves immediate positive punishment following disruptive behavior. Response cost procedures have also been used during the GBG, but previous research has not directly compared positive and negative punishment in the GBG. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of and preference for positive and negative punishment in the GBG. We implemented two versions of the game, the GBG and GBG Response Cost (RC) in a second-grade general education classroom. In addition, we measured student and teacher collateral behaviors. Results of this study demonstrated that the GBG RC initially reduced disruptive behavior to lower levels than the GBG, but both versions of the game were effective in reducing disruptive behavior. We also found that the teacher and most of the students preferred to play the GBG RC. This paper discusses the potential benefits of playing the GBG and provides future recommendations.

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