Thesis

Does parent implemented dialogic reading strategies increase vocabulary acquisition in preschool aged children

Early language and literacy skills are predictors of future academic achievement.
 This study investigated the effects of dialogic reading on children’s expressive and
 receptive vocabulary acquisition. Parent participants received training on dialogic
 reading techniques and the intervention took place in the child’s home. A literature review
 of language and literacy development, benefits of parent involvement, effects of the
 home literacy environment, and an overview of dialogic reading and research is presented.
 Participants included six parent-child dyads from middle-upper socioeconomic
 households. This was a pre/post-test experimental/control group design. All children in
 the study made expressive and receptive vocabulary gains. Overall vocabulary growth
 was compared to Home Literacy Environment Checklist that was completed by the parent vii
 ent participants. Children with lower checklist scores made the greatest vocabulary gains.
 Patterns were found between experimental and control group data and are discussed. A
 similar study design is recommended with a larger group of participants.

Early language and literacy skills are predictors of future academic achievement. This study investigated the effects of dialogic reading on children’s expressive and receptive vocabulary acquisition. Parent participants received training on dialogic reading techniques and the intervention took place in the child’s home. A literature review of language and literacy development, benefits of parent involvement, effects of the home literacy environment, and an overview of dialogic reading and research is presented. Participants included six parent-child dyads from middle-upper socioeconomic households. This was a pre/post-test experimental/control group design. All children in the study made expressive and receptive vocabulary gains. Overall vocabulary growth was compared to Home Literacy Environment Checklist that was completed by the parent vii ent participants. Children with lower checklist scores made the greatest vocabulary gains. Patterns were found between experimental and control group data and are discussed. A similar study design is recommended with a larger group of participants.

Relationships

Items