Project

Exploration of practitioners perceptions of relapse: an exploratory study

This was an exploratory qualitative study of practitioners’ perceptions of relapse. The data collected was through voluntary individual interviews of eleven practitioners. The data was coded and overall themes emerged. The interviewees’ basic definition of recovery was “getting clean.” They discussed relapse as often, but not always, part of recovery. Opinions of 12-Step programs varied from viewing it as treatment, a tool, or support. Humiliation as a form of treatment was frowned upon. Humiliation was equated with shame and guilt and interviewees discussed its unintended consequences and how humiliation may potentially act as a motivator or a barrier to recovery. Furthermore, based upon the level of credential, there was a perceived difference regarding how personally or professionally questions were answered.

Project (M.S.W., Social Work) -- California State University, Sacramento, 2010.

This was an exploratory qualitative study of practitioners’ perceptions of relapse. The data collected was through voluntary individual interviews of eleven practitioners. The data was coded and overall themes emerged. The interviewees’ basic definition of recovery was “getting clean.” They discussed relapse as often, but not always, part of recovery. Opinions of 12-Step programs varied from viewing it as treatment, a tool, or support. Humiliation as a form of treatment was frowned upon. Humiliation was equated with shame and guilt and interviewees discussed its unintended consequences and how humiliation may potentially act as a motivator or a barrier to recovery. Furthermore, based upon the level of credential, there was a perceived difference regarding how personally or professionally questions were answered.

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