Thesis

College students' reflections on the ADHS interventions received during high school: a standpoint analysis of the best practices

Using standpoint framework this study explores first-hand experiences and reflections of university students with ADHD who received accommodations and services for at least one academic year while in high school. This qualitative research focuses on participant’s beliefs of whether interventions they received during high school adequately prepared them to be academically successful for college. Five students (2 females and 3 males) participated in a 60-minute interview consisting of 24 questions that explore participants’ feelings of academic preparedness for college based on their high school accommodations. Findings support previous research that college students with ADHD often struggle academically once they transition into college until they received their “wake up call”. Even though, participants were satisfied with their accommodations in high school, they initially felt unprepared and struggled to adjust academically in college. 
 
 
 
 
 Significantly, participants who reported partaking in extracurricular activities and/or leadership roles in high school felt more confident in their academic skills, reported better social adjustment, and achieved higher grade point averages in college than their counterparts who did not participate in such activities and/or roles.

Thesis (M.A., Sociology)--California State University, Sacramento, 2017.

Using standpoint framework this study explores first-hand experiences and reflections of university students with ADHD who received accommodations and services for at least one academic year while in high school. This qualitative research focuses on participant’s beliefs of whether interventions they received during high school adequately prepared them to be academically successful for college. Five students (2 females and 3 males) participated in a 60-minute interview consisting of 24 questions that explore participants’ feelings of academic preparedness for college based on their high school accommodations. Findings support previous research that college students with ADHD often struggle academically once they transition into college until they received their “wake up call”. Even though, participants were satisfied with their accommodations in high school, they initially felt unprepared and struggled to adjust academically in college. Significantly, participants who reported partaking in extracurricular activities and/or leadership roles in high school felt more confident in their academic skills, reported better social adjustment, and achieved higher grade point averages in college than their counterparts who did not participate in such activities and/or roles.

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