Thesis

Effects of local fatigue on bilateral transfer of skill in a selected fine motor task

The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether practice of a fine motor task with one limb, under the state of local muscular fatigue, resulted in significantly different bilateral transfer than that which occur­ red in a non-fatigued state. Seventy male volunteers, enrolled in San Fernando Valley State College physical education and recreation activity classes, served as subjects for the study. The subjects were ranked based on their pre-test scores. Group I was the fatigue and practice group, Group II was the practice group, and Group III was the control group. The study lasted for seven weeks, with two practice sessions and one testing session per week. Group I fatigued the dominant arm, using a hand dynamometer, and immediately trained on the star-trace maze for two sessions a week, with five trials a session. Group II trained with the dominant arm on the star-trace maze for two sessions a week, with five trials a session. Group III did not receive any training with the dominant arm. All three groups received one testing session a week with the non-dominant arm, with five trials a session. The data were statistically analyzed using the meantime, error and total(time plus error)scores for each subject. The null hypothesis, stating that performance of fine motor tasks with one limb, while in a state of local fatigue, will not significantly affect the amount of bi­ lateral transfer to the opposite limb, was found to be untenable. The following general conclusion appears to be justified: performance of fine motor tasks with one limb, while in a state of local muscular fatigue, will effect the amount of bilateral transfer to the opposite limb. This effect will be in the form of faster times and lower total(time plus errors) scores.

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