Thesis

Using the National Register of Historic Places to preserve and promote golden age architecture golf courses

Drastic changes in sports and recreation happened in the first half of the twentieth century, much of it reflected in the development of golf course architecture. However, only four “Golden Age” (ca. 1910-1940) architecture golf courses that were designed by master architects are on the National Register of Historic Places, and these were nominated for reason other than their architecture. This lack of nominated Golden Age architecture golf courses stems from poor communication between historic preservationists and golf course managers. There has been a renaissance in Golden Age architecture literature over the last few decades. There is also a growing interest is preserving and documenting designed cultural landscapes. Both growing interests are leading to more literature about the two aspects of preservation. It is important to ensure golf course managers understand the National Register of Historic Places does not mean a loss of sovereignty of the golf course. With Internet age communication, the NRHP can be used to encourage both thoughtful preservation and promotion of these unique resources.

Thesis (M.A., History (Public History))--California State University, Sacramento, 2015.

Drastic changes in sports and recreation happened in the first half of the twentieth century, much of it reflected in the development of golf course architecture. However, only four “Golden Age” (ca. 1910-1940) architecture golf courses that were designed by master architects are on the National Register of Historic Places, and these were nominated for reason other than their architecture. This lack of nominated Golden Age architecture golf courses stems from poor communication between historic preservationists and golf course managers. There has been a renaissance in Golden Age architecture literature over the last few decades. There is also a growing interest is preserving and documenting designed cultural landscapes. Both growing interests are leading to more literature about the two aspects of preservation. It is important to ensure golf course managers understand the National Register of Historic Places does not mean a loss of sovereignty of the golf course. With Internet age communication, the NRHP can be used to encourage both thoughtful preservation and promotion of these unique resources.

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