Masters Thesis

Program Re-design of California Children’s Services Maintenance and Transportation Program

California Children’s Services provides the Maintenance and Transportation Program to alleviate financial barriers incurred by CCS families who have to travel out-of-county for their child’s medical appointments. The focus group for this study was The Sierra-Sacramento Central Valley Regional Administration Association, central valley cohort. The central valley cohort is comprised of 18 California Children’s Services county programs. Central California counties confront similar psychosocial barriers affecting CCS families who have to travel out-of-county for their child’s medical treatment plan. The purpose of this study was to identify best practices in California Children’s Services Maintenance and Transportation Program for the central valley cohort. Families with children with special healthcare needs face psychosocial and healthcare access barriers. Literature indicates the damaging impact of missed medical appointments for children with special healthcare needs. The Cycle of Poverty Theory is used to demonstrate the importance of intervention at different aspects to help families break out of the cycle of poverty. Interviews were conducted with eight California Children’s Services Maintenance and Transportation Program Administrators. Responses were analyzed developing two main themes and eight sub-themes. Themes and sub-themes identified were: no best practices, series of paradoxes, retrospective process, expect organized resourceful parents, lack of assistance from outside vendors, incremental budgets/limited funds, retrospective reimbursement, mileage rate of reimbursement, partial housing, and leaders recognize the problem-don’t lead change. Recommendations were based on literature and results of the study. Recommendations included were; expand funding, revamp current system, and implement a dedicated Maintenance and Transportation Department. Recommendations are related to The Cycle of Poverty Theory.

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