Project

Eating and food buying behaviors of CalFresh participants who use their EBT card at farmers markets

Project (M.S.W., Social Work ) -- California State University, Sacramento, 2013.

This study explored the ways in which wireless EBT card terminals at farmers’ markets affect CalFresh participants’ eating and food-purchasing behaviors. Researchers utilized a convenience sampling technique of fifty-eight CalFresh participants who shopped at Sacramento-area farmers’ markets between November 2012 and February 2013. This study incorporated a survey with twenty-six questions regarding participants’ eating and food-buying behaviors. Demographic data, such as gender, ethnicity, age, and neighborhood of residence was also collected. The researchers hypothesize the intervention of EBT terminals at farmers’ markets will be associated with participants’ frequency shopping at farmers’ markets and consumption of healthy foods. A paired samples t-test determined there was a statistically significant difference of -5.60 (sd=11.67, t=-3.65, df=57, p>.001) between the means of participants’ frequency shopping at farmers’ markets before using EBT at farmers’ markets (n=58, M=19.45, sd=17.46) and participants’ frequency shopping at farmers markets after beginning to using EBT at farmers’ markets (n=58, M=25.03, sd=18.21). Another t-test determined there was a statistically significant difference of -1.08 (sd=2.30, t=-3.58, df=57, p>.001) between the means of the number of healthy meals participants’ prepared at home before using EBT at farmers’ markets (n=58, M=9.17, sd=6.70) and the number of healthy meals participants’ prepared at home after beginning to using EBT at farmers’ markets (n=58, M=10.25, sd=6.37). The researchers’ hypotheses were sustained, showing evidence that EBT access at farmers’ markets is related to increased frequency shopping at farmers’ markets and consumption of produce from farmers’ markets.

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