Thesis

Effects of a nine-week junior high foods course upon student breakfast and snack behavior

This study sought to determine whether a nine-week introductory foods course motivated students to increase the frequency with which they ate breakfast during the school week, to improve the nutritional quality of the breakfast foods chosen, and to determine whether the foods course motivated students to decrease the number of low nutrient density snack foods eaten during the school week. Questionnaires, food intake forms, and nutrition tests were administered to students as a Pretest, before the start of the foods course; as Posttest I, following the completion of the foods course; and as Posttest II, four weeks following the completion of the foods course. Sixty-six students participated in the Pretest and Posttest I. Fifty-one of the sixty-six students participated in Posttest II. Statistical analysis was done using the chi square test. The number of low nutrient density snack foods eaten by students was significantly less at Posttest I and Posttest II than at the pretest; Significant at .05. The number of low nutrient density foods eaten by students for breakfast also was significantly less at Posttest I and at Posttest II than at the Pretest; scores significant at .05. Therefore, these null hypotheses were rejected.

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