Thesis

PERCEIVED PARENTING BEHAVIORS, EMOTION DYSREGULATION, AND INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIP ANXIETY OF EMERGING ADULTS

The purposes of this research were to explore (1) the relationship between maternal and paternal rejection with emerging adults' interpersonal relationship anxiety and (2) whether emotion dysregulation mediated the relationship between parental and interpersonal relationship anxiety. A correlational research design was used to analyze data gathered via online, self-report questionnaires from 716 students in a psychology subject pool at a comprehensive university in Southern California. Using zero-order correlations, as well as structural equation modeling, it was found that (a) perceived maternal rejection paternal rejection, and emotion dysregulation were significantly and positively related to students' interpersonal relationship anxiety, and (b) students' emotion dysregulation significantly mediated the relationship between maternal and paternal rejection and interpersonal relationship anxiety. These results suggested practitioners working with emerging adults who experience interpersonal relationship difficulties might investigate clients' perceptions of parent-child relations (e.g., maternal and paternal rejection) and engage in psychoeducation regarding the impact of maladaptive parenting behaviors on offspring. Furthermore, techniques to address emotion dysregulation should be a target of intervention when treating emerging adults with interpersonal relationship difficulties.

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