Thesis

Suicidal ideation among Mexican-American female students at California State University, Stanislaus

Mexican-American female students experience various stresses during their acculturative process. These stresses have been significantly linked to acculturative pressures, increasing the risk for depression and for suicidal ideation. Theoretical models for suicide risk, such as Durkheim Theory, the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide, and the culturally constructed familism were used to explore the prevalence of and factors contributing to suicidal ideation in this population. The purpose of this study was to explore (1) the prevalence of suicidal ideation among Mexican-American female undergraduate and graduate students at California State University, Stanislaus and (2) the factors that contribute to suicidal ideation among Mexican-American female undergraduate and graduate students at California State University, Stanislaus. Understanding the factors that lead to suicidal ideation among Mexican-Americans would help policy makers connect services and policies to assist and serve Mexican-American families. The research analysis was based on a population on 135 self-identified Mexican-American over the age of 18. Consistent with other studies, acculturative stress directly influences the family dynamics in the Mexican-American community with detrimental consequences. The researcher found a high prevalence of depression, which increases the risk for suicidal ideation, as well as a surprisingly high prevalence of resilience amongst the population.

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