Project

The place of Chicana feminism and Chicano art in the history curriculum

Chicanos are essentially absent from the State of California United States History Content Standards, as a result Chicanos are excluded from the narrative of American history. Because Chicanos are not included in the content standards and due to the lack of readily available resources, this presents a challenge for teachers to teach about the role Chicanos have played in U.S. history. Chicanas have also largely been left out of the narrative of the Chicano Movement, also therefore resulting in an incomplete history of the Chicano Movement. This gap in our historical record depicts an inaccurate representation of our nation’s history. 
 Research was conducted at the Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA) at the California State University, Sacramento and Sacramento State University Library. The Royal Chicano Air Force Collection and the Sally Wagoner Collection at SCUA along with articles from Chicano magazines such as Regeneración form the basis of this research.
 Including instruction on the Chicano struggle for equality in the United States would enhance the curriculum and create a more complete historical narrative. Chicana feminism and their contributions to the Chicano Movement need to be further researched. The use of primary sources and the explicit teaching and scaffolding of historical thinking allows students to critically engage with historical content while learning the skills necessary to grapple with and think deeply about historical questions.

Project (M.A., History)--California State University, Sacramento, 2012.

Chicanos are essentially absent from the State of California United States History Content Standards, as a result Chicanos are excluded from the narrative of American history. Because Chicanos are not included in the content standards and due to the lack of readily available resources, this presents a challenge for teachers to teach about the role Chicanos have played in U.S. history. Chicanas have also largely been left out of the narrative of the Chicano Movement, also therefore resulting in an incomplete history of the Chicano Movement. This gap in our historical record depicts an inaccurate representation of our nation’s history. Research was conducted at the Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA) at the California State University, Sacramento and Sacramento State University Library. The Royal Chicano Air Force Collection and the Sally Wagoner Collection at SCUA along with articles from Chicano magazines such as Regeneración form the basis of this research. Including instruction on the Chicano struggle for equality in the United States would enhance the curriculum and create a more complete historical narrative. Chicana feminism and their contributions to the Chicano Movement need to be further researched. The use of primary sources and the explicit teaching and scaffolding of historical thinking allows students to critically engage with historical content while learning the skills necessary to grapple with and think deeply about historical questions.

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