Thesis

EFFECTS OF MENTORSHIP ON SELF-EFFICACY IN NEW FIRE APPARATUS ENGINEERS

This study investigated the experiences of newly promoted fire apparatus engineers
 within CAL FIRE. Provided is a description of the organization, the fire apparatus
 engineer position duties, and mandated training prior to appointment. A presentation
 of the literature published regarding the construct of self-efficacy is included, as well as,
 the literature discussing mentor relationships, particularly in the workplace and the fire
 service. This study investigated the experiences of newly promoted fire apparatus engineers
 within CAL FIRE. Provided is a description of the organization, the fire apparatus
 engineer position duties, and mandated training prior to appointment. A presentation
 of the literature published regarding the construct of self-efficacy is included, as well as,
 the literature discussing mentor relationships, particularly in the workplace and the fire
 service.This study investigated the experiences of newly promoted fire apparatus engineers
 within CAL FIRE. Provided is a description of the organization, the fire apparatus
 engineer position duties, and mandated training prior to appointment. A presentation
 of the literature published regarding the construct of self-efficacy is included, as well as,
 the literature discussing mentor relationships, particularly in the workplace and the fire
 service. The design of the investigation elicited the perspective of the new fire apparatus
 engineer; specifically, attempting to develop a greater understanding of the availability
 of mentor relationships. The study investigated the effect that mentor relationships have on these individual’s perception of effectiveness and their occupational selfefficacy.
 Two methods of data collection were utilized: personal interviews and a reflective
 test of occupational self-efficacy. The research documented the experiences of
 seven new fire apparatus engineers during the 2011 fire season. The researcher reflectively
 analyzed the interviews and found two participants had formed mentor relationships.
 Each of the participants was able to discuss his perception of effectiveness through
 the four components of self-efficacy. The data from the occupational self-efficacy test
 was tabulated and averaged, providing unexpected results.
 Participants formed mentor relationships directly affected three of the four
 components of self-efficacy: vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and psychological
 arousal. Qualitative evidence documented each individual’s experiences and provided
 insight into the relationship between mentorship and self-efficacy.

This study investigated the experiences of newly promoted fire apparatus engineers within CAL FIRE. Provided is a description of the organization, the fire apparatus engineer position duties, and mandated training prior to appointment. A presentation of the literature published regarding the construct of self-efficacy is included, as well as, the literature discussing mentor relationships, particularly in the workplace and the fire service. This study investigated the experiences of newly promoted fire apparatus engineers within CAL FIRE. Provided is a description of the organization, the fire apparatus engineer position duties, and mandated training prior to appointment. A presentation of the literature published regarding the construct of self-efficacy is included, as well as, the literature discussing mentor relationships, particularly in the workplace and the fire service.This study investigated the experiences of newly promoted fire apparatus engineers within CAL FIRE. Provided is a description of the organization, the fire apparatus engineer position duties, and mandated training prior to appointment. A presentation of the literature published regarding the construct of self-efficacy is included, as well as, the literature discussing mentor relationships, particularly in the workplace and the fire service. The design of the investigation elicited the perspective of the new fire apparatus engineer; specifically, attempting to develop a greater understanding of the availability of mentor relationships. The study investigated the effect that mentor relationships have on these individual’s perception of effectiveness and their occupational selfefficacy. Two methods of data collection were utilized: personal interviews and a reflective test of occupational self-efficacy. The research documented the experiences of seven new fire apparatus engineers during the 2011 fire season. The researcher reflectively analyzed the interviews and found two participants had formed mentor relationships. Each of the participants was able to discuss his perception of effectiveness through the four components of self-efficacy. The data from the occupational self-efficacy test was tabulated and averaged, providing unexpected results. Participants formed mentor relationships directly affected three of the four components of self-efficacy: vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and psychological arousal. Qualitative evidence documented each individual’s experiences and provided insight into the relationship between mentorship and self-efficacy.

Relationships

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