Thesis

Motor development and visual perception of kindergarten children

This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of a motor skills program on the visual perception and motor skills of a group of inner-city kindergarten children. Sixty kindergarten children were involved in the study. The children were given the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test and 2 subgroups resulted within the control and experimental group. The experimental group was found at a school which provided a daily motor skills program for its kindergarten children. The control group was found at a school one mile from the experimental group that had no motor skills program. Subjects were pretested in the third week of school. The experimental group began 7 weeks of a motor skills program for 20 minutes a day while the control group was exposed to regular instruction. The experimental group was exposed to activities which were designed to promote self-Control, shape recognition, body image, and eye-hand coordination and letter recognition. Findings reported in this study indicated that: 1. Subjects in the motor skills training group evidenced significant gains in the Frostig post-test. 2. Subjects in the motor skills training group evidenced significant gains on the motor skills posttest.3. Age did not prove to be a significant variable in the posttest results.4. Intelligence did not prove to be a significant variable on pre and posttest results.

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