Thesis

Personality and criminal thinking styles: do personality patterns affect criminality?

Among mental illnesses in the prison population, Antisocial Personality Disorder (APD) is one of the most prevalent disorders. For effective offender rehabilitation, it is necessary to research mental disorders, particularly APD, in the criminal justice system. The current study uses the Psychological Inventory of Criminal Thinking Styles (PICTS) with the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III) to find connections between types of criminal thinking and antisocial personalities. Results of this study indicate that antisocial personality patterns have no significant relations to general, proactive, or reactive criminal thinking. Further research is needed to verify which personality patterns can be connected to these three types of criminal thinking and help to individualize treatment for offenders.

Thesis (M.S., Criminal Justice)--California State University, Sacramento, 2016

Among mental illnesses in the prison population, Antisocial Personality Disorder (APD) is one of the most prevalent disorders. For effective offender rehabilitation, it is necessary to research mental disorders, particularly APD, in the criminal justice system. The current study uses the Psychological Inventory of Criminal Thinking Styles (PICTS) with the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III) to find connections between types of criminal thinking and antisocial personalities. Results of this study indicate that antisocial personality patterns have no significant relations to general, proactive, or reactive criminal thinking. Further research is needed to verify which personality patterns can be connected to these three types of criminal thinking and help to individualize treatment for offenders.

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