Thesis

Women's self-defense and social interaction

Thesis (M.A., Sociology)--California State University, Sacramento, 2011

The present study explores the process of and changes in social interaction of women who recently completed a women’s self-defense course. Eighteen women from three different courses participated in semi-structured interviews and answered questions related to changes they experienced in their interactions at home, at work, and in public spaces as a result of taking their course. The qualitative analysis was performed looking through the lens of social interaction. It was found that situational awareness, perspective-taking, and self-perceptions of efficacy were powerfully affected by taking a women’s self-defense course. Implications for future research include the potential for perspective-taking as an intentional pedagogical tool to help both aggressive and passive responders.

The present study explores the process of and changes in social interaction of women who recently completed a women’s self-defense course. Eighteen women from three different courses participated in semi-structured interviews and answered questions related to changes they experienced in their interactions at home, at work, and in public spaces as a result of taking their course. The qualitative analysis was performed looking through the lens of social interaction. It was found that situational awareness, perspective-taking, and self-perceptions of efficacy were powerfully affected by taking a women’s self-defense course. Implications for future research include the potential for perspective-taking as an intentional pedagogical tool to help both aggressive and passive responders.

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