Dissertation

An examination of school psychologist self-efficacy

The purpose of this study was to investigate school psychologist self-efficacy across three major roles and functions. Multiple linear regressions showed that the experience level of school psychologists predicted their self-efficacy for intervention and consultation skills and multidimensional assessment skills. The education level of school psychologists predicted their self-efficacy for counseling skills. Individual interviews with school psychologists revealed that three of the five participants had higher self-efficacy for multidimensional assessment skills and lower self-efficacy for counseling skills as a result of their experience level and the socioeconomic, racial, and ethnic diversity of their employment settings. Multiple linear regressions also showed that effectiveness with the students served predicted school psychologist self-efficacy for intervention and consultation skills. Support from parents/guardians and community members predicted school psychologist self-efficacy for counseling skills. Individual interviews with school psychologists revealed that environmental work factors such as administrative support, collegial atmosphere among staff, access to resources, and ratio of students to school psychologists affected how they carry out their roles. Overall, these findings suggest improvements that can be done with regard to mental health support, caseload management, cohesiveness among educational stakeholders, and professional development opportunities.

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